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A former student of Nearing, Rexford Guy Tugwell, also taught The Landlord's Game at Wharton, and took it with him to Columbia University.

Apart from commercial distribution, it spread by word of mouth and was played in slightly variant homemade versions over the years by Quakers, Georgists, university students (including students at Smith College, Princeton, and MIT), and others who became aware of it. area with her husband by 1923, and re-patented a revised version of The Landlord's Game in 1924 (under her married name, Elizabeth Magie Phillips).

His students made their own boards, and taught the game to others.

After Nearing was dismissed from the Wharton School, he began teaching at the University of Toledo.

In 1989, the first of many video game and computer game editions was published.

Since 1994, many official variants of the game, based on locations other than Atlantic City, New Jersey (the official U. setting) or London (the official Commonwealth setting, excepting Canada), have been published by Hasbro or its licensees.

She knew that some people would find it hard to understand the logic behind the idea, and she thought that if the rent problem and the Georgist solution to it were put into the concrete form of a game, it might be easier to demonstrate.

Also in the 1970s, Professor Ralph Anspach, who had himself published a board game intended to illustrate the principles of both monopolies and trust busting, fought Parker Brothers and its then parent company, General Mills, over the copyright and trademarks of the Monopoly board game.

Through the research of Anspach and others, much of the early history of the game was "rediscovered" and entered into official United States court records.

Because of the lengthy court process, including appeals, the legal status of Parker Brothers' copyright and trademarks on the game was not settled until 1985.

The game's name remains a registered trademark of Parker Brothers, as do its specific design elements; other elements of the game are still protected under copyright law.

The history of the board game Monopoly can be traced back to the early 20th century.